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Ruminant Nutrition and Management

Ruminant Nutrition and Management Research

It is an exciting time to be involved in ruminant nutrition research. Oklahoma currently ranks in the top 5 cattle producing states for all cattle and calves and cattle are the number one agricultural commodity in Oklahoma, with cash receipts in excess of $3 billion annually. Cattle prices quickly rose to record levels followed by a rapid decline, many developing countries are in the early stages of a population explosion, and there is an increased interest in production technologies, food safety, animal welfare, and the sustainability of production agriculture in developed countries.

Dr. Dave Lalman

My research and extension program emphasis is on increasing profitability and reducing cost of production through improved forage utilization, better matching beef cattle genetics to forage resources and evaluating beef production systems and alternatives. program emphasis is on increasing profitability and reducing cost of production through improved forage utilization, better matching beef cattle genetics to forage resources and evaluating beef production systems and alternatives.

Dr. Ryan Reuter

My research focuses on evaluating new technologies to improve the sustainability of beef grazing systems. We conduct experiments in both wheat pasture and warm-season perennial grass grazing systems to test new delivery systems of supplemental nutrients and compounds.  We also develop and evaluate sensors, equipment, and devices that enable precision management of grazing cattle.  We can monitor greenhouse gas emissions of grazing cattle using our GreenFeed equipment.

The overall goal is to create a win-win for both ranchers and consumers by increasing the efficiency of beef production on grazing lands while simultaneously reducing beef production’s carbon footprint and impact on the environment.  We plan to achieve this through technology-enabled precision management.

Dr. Chris Richards

My research focuses on feedlot/stocker cattle applied nutrition and management. My current research projects focus on the cattle performance and consumer product implications of the inclusion of wet distillers grains in steam-flaked corn finishing diets. Additional efforts are focused on the evaluation of remote rumen temperature monitoring technologies for evaluating calf health and improving the efficiency and well-being of growing cattle.

Dr. Blake Wilson

I have researched beef production practices and production systems, recently having a significant involvement in an intensive experiment involving natural and conventional beef production with nutritional, animal welfare, and production sustainability components. I have also been involved in research evaluating other important production practices such as castration and vaccination.

My research program focuses on applied ruminant nutrition and beef cattle systems research. Specific research areas I will continue to investigate include: the evaluation of current commonly accepted technologies and management and production practices, improving calf performance and health in the stocker and receiving phases, improving cattle efficiency and welfare during the finishing period, and the use of nontraditional feeds and innovative management practices to improve overall beef production. With the resources available at Oklahoma State, I hope to be able to eventually do more systems-based research as the university has access to cow-calf operations, stocker facilities, a research feedlot, and a metabolism facility. This affords me the ability to investigate research problems from conception through consumption.

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