Charbray

The Charbray is the results of the blending of two breeds, the Charolais and the Brahman. The Charbray is 5/8 Charolais and 3/8 Brahman. The hump of the Brahman is almost non-existent, but the loose skin and enlarged dewlap are indications of the Bos indicus blood in this breed.

 The Charbray is a large, very rugged breed that is heavily muscled in the loin and quarters. They have been well accepted in those areas where cattle carrying at least some Brahman breeding are desired because of hot and humid conditions.

Charbray is a large to moderately sized breed with very good growth rates on their calves. The calves are generally light tan when born but usually lighten to a creamy white in a few weeks. The Charbray bull is reported to be structurally sound and have the ability to travel the distances required of bulls in hot humid environments. They have been selected for clean, tight sheaths, fertility and early testicular development. The Charbray female is also said fertile and early maturing, reaching puberty at 14-17 months and calving at or near two years of age with rapid rebreeding and good milk production.

 In research at Texas A&M University Agricultural Research Center, McGregor, Texas, Charbray out-performed all other breeds tested for a 180-day weaning weight-both as a straightbred calf and when Charbray bulls were used on seven different breeds of dams.

 Sources indicate the Charbray calves show excellent performance in the feedlot. Their resistance to heat, humidity, parasites and diseases is to their benefit in southern feedlots. They grow rapidly and have outstanding feed converting ability. They reach slaughter weights at 12 to 15 months and produce lean, yield grade 1 and 2 carcasses that require little or no fat trimming.

Charbray Breed Associations and Registries

Reference:

 Briggs, H.M. & D.M. Briggs. Modern Breeds of Livestock. Fourth Edition. Macmillan Publishing Co. 1980

 Promotional materials from the American-International Charolais Association, Kansas City, MO provided by Dr. Michael L. Thonney, Professor of Animal Science, Cornell University


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Updated June 25, 1996